When people hear the term “eye transplant”, they probably think of a patient having their entire eye replaced with another one. While doctors and scientists are working hard on making that type of procedure a reality, modern medicine is not quite there yet. When you hear your eye doctor in Miami Beach mention an eye transplant, they are talking about a procedure which involves replacing a specific portion of the eye– most commonly the cornea. The cornea is the outer layer of the eye that’s almost entirely responsible for properly focusing light onto the retina in the back of the eye. If someone’s cornea is shaped abnormally, then they are going to have vision problems like nearsightedness or farsightedness. While these conditions are easily treatable by a Miami eye doctor, there are times when a corneal transplant is necessary.

Why Do People Get a Corneal Transplant?

Transplanting the cornea is necessary in some cases because a patient was unable to correct their vision issues with glasses or contacts. Most of the time, glasses or contacts are sufficient, but this isn’t always the case. A doctor in Miami Beach will know when to recommend this surgery for their patient, and it’s usually always a last resort option.

● When glasses or contacts don’t correct vision problems.

● Keratoconus. This is a condition that causes the cornea to become weak and thin over time, which can result in the need for a new cornea.

● A hole in the cornea from physical damage.

● An infection in the cornea that won’t go away with antibiotic treatments.

● Scarring in the cornea from a previous injury or an infection.

Will a Corneal Transplant Solve the Problem?

In most cases, a corneal transplant is going to have a high probability of working because it’s a last resort option to treat a condition. A Miami optometrist will not recommend a corneal transplant before they try numerous prescriptions for contacts and glasses, and they may even ask for a second opinion from another doctor before recommending it. Those who are dealing with degenerative conditions are more likely to be recommended for an “eye transplant”, but even then, they are used as a last resort option. While the surgery is not a major one and there is very little risk of complication, it’s still not something that a patient would want to go through or a doctor would recommend unless absolutely necessary.