A common question that eye doctors in Miami are asked is what exactly the macula is. Most people have heard of macular degeneration at some point in their life, but many do not know exactly what the macula really is. In short, the macula is the center region of the retina that allows a person to distinguish what is directly in front of them. Without the macula, people would not be able to read or write as they would not be able to focus on objects that are in the center of their field of vision. A Miami Beach eye doctor will be able to examine a patient’s macula using special tools and determine if it’s healthy or if it appears to be degenerating. Catching macular degeneration before it seriously affects vision is good because there are things that doctors can do to slow down the degeneration of the macula.

Facts About the Macula

If you ask your Miami optometrist to tell you a little more about the macula, then you’re likely going to hear some of these things:

  • The macula is separated into six different regions; the umbo, the foveola, the foveal avascular zone, the fovea, the parafovea, and the perifovea.
  • The entire diameter of the macula is about 5.5 mm.
  • The fovea is the part of the macula that contains many cone cells, or cells that are responsible for distinguishing different colors.
  • The macula is also where rod cells can be found, which are responsible for distinguishing light and darkness.

How to Ensure Your Macula is Healthy

Your eye doctor in Miami will likely tell you things that you need to be watching out for, such as a loss of vision in low-light situations, but the only true way to tell if your macula is in good health is to be examined by a medical professional. They can use special tools to examine your macula and determine its current state of health. A macula that is beginning to degenerate will have obvious tissue damage to the trained eye of a medical professional. Also, if your family has a history of macular degeneration, then you may want to be examined for degeneration at least once or twice each year. This way you will be able to catch the issue early and do everything you can to preserve your vision for as long as possible.

photo credit: r.nial.bradshaw eye-window-macro.jpg via photopin (license)

Originally posted 2017-04-12 08:29:15.