There are times when a curious patient will ask their Miami Beach eye doctor about the ciliary muscles in their eyes. These muscles play a crucial role in a person’s ability to focus, as they control the crystalline lens which allows someone to see objects up close or at a distance. The ciliary body is also responsible for secreting aqueous humour, the fluid that’s found in the front of the eye. The ciliary muscles produce the fluid in the front of the eye, and they are also responsible for regulating the flow of the fluid from the eye. The ciliary muscles work in conjunction with dilator muscles that control the iris and pupil. Most people don’t have problems with this portion of their eye, but for someone who has trouble focusing naturally, they may need to be prescribed eyeglasses in Miami Beach.

The Importance of the Ciliary Muscles

A person’s ability to focus naturally is one of the most important parts of their vision overall. These muscles are the reason that objects in the background will appear blurry when looking at something up close, and vice versa. People who are thinking about asking their Miami eye doctor about this part of their eyes will find out some interesting things.

● Certain forms of glaucoma can be treated by causing the ciliary muscles to contract, opening the trabecular meshwork and allowing fluid to drain properly.

● The production of aqueous humour is important to the overall function of the eye because it provides a support system for the lens and cornea, which do not have their own blood supplies.

● Issues with the ciliary muscles often result in glaucoma or vision problems in general.

● The ciliary muscles are constantly adjusting and moving as people look at different objects, both near and far.

Issues With the Ciliary Muscles

Most commonly, an eye doctor in Miami Beach can tell if someone is having issues with their ciliary muscles when they are running vision tests. Patients who take abnormally long to look at an object in the distance when compared to the previous one normally have some type of problem with their ciliary muscles. If an eye doctor notices this, they will tell a patient to come back for examinations every few months just to be sure that glaucoma isn’t developing. When pressure inside the eye builds up, it can cause damage to the optic nerves in the back of the eye, resulting in diminished or permanent vision loss.

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